A few apron plaques

16th century or later, Tibet, apron plaque, bone, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York (USA).

This dancing skeleton stands on a double lotus base, its right foot on a skull (the lower jaw missing).

17th-18th century, Tibet, apron plaque, bone and ivory, at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (USA).

A four-hand female in a dancing pose on a lotus pedestal, Kirtimukha underneath. She seems to be holding a staff.

18th century, Tibet, apron plaque, bone?, private collection.

A similar character, holding a drum and a staff in her upper hands.

Same as before.

This one has a vajra sceptre and a skull cup in her main hands.

Undated, Tibet, bone, private collection.

This more elaborate one depicts various tantric figures and mythical creatures, including a garuda at the top.

Circa 16th century, Tibet, apron plaque with Vajravarahi, bone, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York (USA).

Circa 16th century, Tibet, apron plaque, bone, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York (USA).

A two-handed dancing female, and Kirtimukha below.

 

Advertisements

Chang pot

19th century, Tibet, chang pot, wood and metal overlay, Tibet Collection at the Liverpool Museum (UK).

19th century, Tibet, chang pot, wood with brass and copper overlay, Liverpool Museum Tibet Collection (UK).

Shaped like a duck, this jug was possibly used to serve chang (a cereal-based alcohol). There is a lotus bud finial on the lid and medallions with Kirtimukha and auspicious symbols around the body.